Updates

Attacks on public health defeated—for now.

The coal lobby and their allies are trying to block the EPA from protecting public health, but we’ve held the line against some of their worst attacks: In March, the U.S. Senate rejected a bill that would have blocked standards for soot, mercury and carbon pollution. In April, the Senate defeated four more bills that would have blocked the EPA from cutting air pollution.

Report | Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center

10 Ways to Help Your City Go Solar

Last month's Shining Cities report detailed how cities are good for solar and solar is good for cities. We've seen some impressive strides across the nation to momentously expand our solar capabilities. But we're not where we need to be yet. To obtain a clean energy future your cities and towns need to do even more. Here's how to push them in the right direction! 

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News Release | Environment Virginia Research & Policy Center

Virginia wetlands are ‘shelter from the storm’

Sufficient wetlands remain in Virginia to hold enough rain to cover the city of Hampton in more than thirty feet water, according to a new report by Environment Virginia Research & Policy Center.

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Report | Environment Virginia Research & Policy Center

Shelter from the Storm

Virginia's wetlands are nature's flood control but they are in trouble.

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News Release | Environment Virginia Research & Policy Center

Report: Dangerous Inheritance we're passing to Virginia's youth

Young adults in Virginia are experiencing hotter temperatures and more intense storms than their predecessors did in the 1970’s, according to a new report by Environment Virginia Research & Policy Center.

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Report | Environment Virginia Research & Policy Center

Dangerous Inheritance

As a result of global warming, young Virginians today are growing up in a different climate than their parents and grandparents experienced. It is warmer than it used to be. Storms pack more of a punch. Rising seas increasingly flood low-lying land. People are noticing changes in their own backyards, no matter where they live.

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